I’m Professor of History at the University of Texas at Arlington.

My scholarship focuses on the preconditions of the Haitian Revolution, with special attention to cultural concepts of race and, more recently, the lives of enslaved people. The New York Times has an excellent series explaining how Haitians paid France a massive “ransom”  for the independence they won in the Revolution.

In Fall 2022 I’m finishing a book titled “A Secret Among the Blacks”:  Slave Resistance Before the Haitian Revolution, coming out on Harvard University Press in 2023. The book charts three decades of slave resistance in the region where the Haitian Revolution began. New archival discoveries show how the world’s only successful slave revolution grew out of people’s attempts to survive epidemic disease, oppression, and malicious prosecutions. An Andrew Carnegie Fellowship (2019-21) and a year at the National Humanities Center (2017-18) allowed me to write most of this work.

You can see some of this research in my recent article about the devastating impact of livestock disease on enslaved people in Saint-Domingue. It appears in October 2021 issue of the William & Mary Quarterly.

UTA Research Profile; Google Scholar Profile

Contact me at:
Department of History
Box 19529
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington TX 76019-0529
UTA History Office: (817) 272-2861
Garrigus@uta.edu