I’m Professor of History at the University of Texas at Arlington.

I study French colonial Haiti, which was called Saint-Domingue in the eighteenth century. My scholarship focuses on the pre-conditions of the Haitian Revolution, with special attention to cultural concepts of race and, more recently, the lives of enslaved people.

I’m finishing a book about slave resistance leading up to the Haitian Revolution. An Andrew Carnegie Fellowship and a year at the National Humanities Center allowed me to write most of this work. The book centers on the stories enslaved and free people told about Fran├žois Macandal, an African man whom colonists executed for leading a poison conspiracy.

You can see some of this research in my recent article about the devastating impact of livestock disease on enslaved people in Saint-Domingue. It appears in October 2021 issue of the William & Mary Quarterly.

In Spring 2022, I’m teaching a graduate course called Approaches to World History and an undergraduate course called Pirates, Planters, and Freedom Fighters. See the syllabus page for details.

UTA Research Profile; Google Scholar Profile

Contact me at:
Department of History
Box 19529
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington TX 76019-0529
UTA History Office: (817) 272-2861
Garrigus@uta.edu