Researching Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution

Month: August 2022

HIST3365 Early Modern France and the Revolution

HIST 3365-001
Fall 2022; MWF 9:00 AM – 9:50AM
University Hall 08

Land Acknowledgement

UT Arlington respectfully acknowledges the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes upon whose historical homelands this University is located. Their ancestors resided here for generations before being forcibly displaced by U.S. settlers and soldiers in the mid-1800s. We recognize the historical presence of the Caddo Nation and other Tribal Nations in the region; the ongoing presence and achievements of many people who moved to the area due to the Indian Relocation program of the 1950s and 1960s; and the vital presence and accomplishments of our Native students, faculty, and staff.

Instructor Information

Instructor: John Garrigus; website: http://johngarrigus.com
Office: University Hall 343
Student “Drop-In” Hours: Mon. and Wed., 10am to 11; I’ll also be available on Teams in those hours
History Department Office Telephone: 817-272-2661
Email: garrigus@uta.edu
Faculty Profile: https://mentis.uta.edu/explore/profile/john-garrigus

Course Information

Section Information: HIST 3365-001

Time and Place of Class Meetings:  9am to 9:50 am Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays in University Hall 08

Required Book: Jeremy Popkin, A Short History of the French Revolution (Routledge, 2019) 7th edition.

If you cannot afford this edition, please buy a used copy of an earlier edition, which will be more affordable.

Other required reading materials will be available on Canvas.

Technology Requirements:

We will use Canvas throughout the semester to submit papers, administer quizzes, and share course materials.

Description of Course Content:

Focusing on France in the years from 1600 to 1815, this course charts the emergence of a centralized state and eventually the idea of a French “nation”. We’ll study the so-called French Enlightenment and discuss its complex legacy. We’ll place France in a wider Atlantic context, recognizing that the French Revolution was part of an Age of Revolutions that included the American and especially Haitian Revolutions.  As part of our work, you will learn how to interpret primary and secondary sources, skills that are the foundation of historical knowledge.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to identify major cities and regions of France on a map. To be assessed on a map quiz.
  • Students will be able to describe and analyze primary sources. To be assessed in three assigned papers.
  • Students will be able to describe secondary sources. To be assessed in three assigned papers.
  • Students will be able to describe historical thinking skills and apply them to French history. To be assessed in three assigned papers.

Expectations

You can expect me to:

  • answer your email within 24 hours if you send it through Canvas. At some points in the term, my inbox gets quite full, but I do want to hear from you. If you email me and don’t hear back from me within 24 hours, please send a follow up email. I will appreciate the gentle reminder.
  • be glad to see you in my student drop-by hours or any other mutually convenient time we can get together on campus. We can discuss the reading, the assignments; I’d like to hear about your, your plans for the future and your activities outside of class
  • let you take each quiz twice, counting the highest score.
  • give you extensions of a few days for our papers IF you are keeping up with the quizzes and discussion. You do have to ask, however.
  • give you detailed feedback on each paper. On the next paper, I’ll grade you on whether you used my feedback to improve your work. This course is designed to help you grow your abilities.
  • take plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty quite seriously. Please read the academic dishonesty section and ask me — throughout the semester — if you have questions.

I expect you to:

  • understand that performing poorly on an assignment is a sign that you need to change your strategies or get help. Challenges are a standard part of learning, which is why you should use UTA services (tutoring, counseling, the Writing Center) as much as you can.
  • contact me using Canvas or email when you have questions or problems concerning the class.
  • participate in class discussions, which are an essential part of this course.
  • finish the reading on time so you can be fully involved in our class meetings.
  • use the UTA Writing Center for your assignments. They have on-line appointments! Learning how to use UTA’s resources is an essential (and normal) part of the learning process.
  • understand what plagiarism is and ask me if you have questions any time during the semester.

Grading and Assignment Information

Assignment Points Description
Map quiz (in class, Monday August 29) 50 On a map with the outline of France, you’ll identify 10 regions, cities, or rivers from a list I provide.  There’s a practice map at the end of the Word doc version of this syllabus
10 weekly journal questions 100 For 14 weeks this semester, I’ll post a question about a primary source assigned for that week.  You’ll answer 10 of them over the semester. This should be an easy A! I’ll award 10 points for an answer that shows that you did the reading, and 5 points for one that does not show this.
16 weekly reading quizzes 100 Every week on Canvas, I’ll post a short (6 or 7 questions) multiple-choice quiz over that week’s secondary reading; you can take each quiz 2 times and only the highest score counts.
Discussion/participation 120 I take notes on your presence and involvement in our class discussions. Fridays are especially important for this.
2 Writing Center visits 30 About a week before each of our papers, you’ll make an on-line appointment with UTA Writing Center to go over a draft of your work. When the Center sends me a message about your appointment, I’ll give you the points. Make an appointment at https://uta.mywconline.com  Be sure to give them a copy of your assignment.
2 papers; (Due on Monday, Sept 26 at 7pm and Monday, October 31, at 7pm) 300 You’ll write a 5-page paper based on primary and secondary sources for our unit on early modern France and, following the same framework, about the causes of the Revolution. You’ll submit the paper on Canvas.
Final paper (Due on December 10) 300 At the end of the semester, you’ll write about what the French Revolution accomplished and merge those ideas with revised versions of your two earlier papers for the final paper.
TOTAL 1000 At the end of the semester, students who have accumulated 900 or more points will receive a “A”; 800 to 899 is a “B”; 700 to 799 is a “C”; etc.

 

Course Schedule

Early Modern France, 1500-1715

[overarching question: What forces created monarchical France out of disparate regions and social groups?]

Week 1 Defining France

Reading:  NYT article (April 2022); Bell, “Lingua populi” (1995) pp1403- 1413 and Moheau, “Research .. on the French Population” (1778) and Lefevre, “Journal of a country priest,” (1709)

August 22 What is/was France? Society and politics in the early modern era
August 24 Church and the Renaissance
August 26 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 2 Social and Political structures

Reading:  Beik, “Ecclesiastical Power and religious faith” (2009); Mornay, “A Defense of Liberty against Tyrants,” (1579)

August 29 The Protestant Reformation, War, and Politics; MAP QUIZ
              August 31 Louis XIII and Richelieu
September 2 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 3 The Rise of Louis XIV

Reading:  Peter Burke, “Introducing Louis XIV” (1992); Colbert, “Instructions,”(1663) and “Grands Jours d’Auvergne” (1996)

September 5 NO CLASS because of Labor Day; 3 10-minute on-line lectures on the young Louis XIV
September 7 Absolutism: The Sun King at his peak
September 9 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 4 War and Colonies

Reading:  Dull, “Ships of the Line” and “Louis XIV and his Wars” (2009); Richard Herr, “Honor versus absolutism: Richelieu’s fight against dueling,” (1955); Louvois, “Letters,” (1683-84)

September 12 Warfare on land: the “military revolution” of the 1600s
September 14 Warfare at sea:  French Canada and the Antilles
September 16 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 5 The End of the Sun King

Reading: Burke, “The reverse of the medal,” (1992);  Fénelon, “The Condition of the French Army,” (1710) and “Questions for the Royal Conscience”

September 19 Famine and War
September 21 The Emergence of Opposition
September 23 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings and the paper

The Slow Collapse of the Monarchy, 1715-1789

[overarching question: what caused the French Revolution?]

Week 6 The Origins of Enlightenment
Reading: Julian Swan, “Politics: Louis XV,” pp 195-204; Dorinda Outram, “What is Enlightenment?”(2005); Immanuel Kant, “What is Enlightenment?” (1784)

September 26 Politics under a new King (1st Paper DUE on Monday, Sept 26; 7pm)
              September 28 Science and Religion
September 30 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 7 Consumption and the “French Atlantic”

Reading: Kwass, “Big Hair: A Wig History of Consumption in Eighteenth‐Century France,” (2006)AHR pp631-60; Burnard and Garrigus, Plantation Machine (2016) p32-38; 42-48; Girod Chantrans, “Plantation Slaves,” (1785)

October 3 The Rise of Consumer Culture
October 5 France’s Atlantic Slave Empire
October 7 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 8 City Life, Reform

Reading: Garrioch, Making of Revolutionary Paris (2004) Chapter 2 (p45-63,) and part of Chapter 5 (p115-27); Voltaire, selections from Treatise on Toleration (1764)

October 10 Life in the Cities
October 12 Crime and Punishment
October 14 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 9 Sociability and Sexuality

Reading: Robert Darnton, “Introduction,” and “Philosophy Under the Cloak” (1996); Montesquieu, The Persian Letters, Letters 10-14; 24-26; 46-48; 55-56; 83-95; 105-106; 116-117; 125-128; 142-145.

October 17 Enlightenment Society
October 19 Gender, Race, and the Enlightenment
October 21 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 10 War and Taxes

Reading: Popkin, Short History, 1-23 [Ch1] ; “A Royal Tongue Lashing,” (1766) and “Remonstrance” (1775)

October 24 The Age of Atlantic Warfare
October 26 The Collapse of the Monarchy
October 28 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings and the 2nd paper

The Revolution, 1789-1815

[overarching question: what did the French Revolution accomplish?]

Week 11  The Estates General

Reading: Popkin, Short History, pp24-61 [Ch2 and Ch3] including primary source documents and images; other primary sources to be posted on Canvas

October 31 The Summer of 1789 (2nd Paper DUE Monday October 31, 7pm)
              November 2 The Church and the Revolution
November 4 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 12 The Constituent and Legislative Assemblies

Reading: Popkin, pp 62-82 [Ch4] including primary source documents and images; other primary sources to be posted on Canvas

November 7 The End of the Monarchy
November 9 The Black Revolution in Saint-Domingue
November 11 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 13  The First Republic and the Terror

Reading: Popkin, pp 83-108 [Ch5] including primary source documents and images; other primary sources to be posted on Canvas

November 14 External and Internal Wars
November 16 The Reign of Terror
November 18 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 14  (THANKSGIVING WEEK) Thermidor

Reading: Popkin, pp 109-128 [Ch6] including primary source documents and images; other primary sources to be posted on Canvas

November 21 Thermidor and the Directory

Week 15  Napoleon Bonaparte

Reading: Popkin, pp 128-160 [Ch7 and 8] including primary source documents and images; other primary sources to be posted on Canvas

November 28 The Rise of Napoleon
November 30 Napoleon’s Empire
December 2 DISCUSSION of the week’s readings

Week 16  Legacy of the Revolution

Reading: Popkin, Short History, pp 161-175

December 5 The Legacy of the Revolution

FINAL PROJECT DUE: Dec 10 FINAL PAPER

As instructor, I reserve the right to change the course schedule and policies in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

Institutional Information

UTA students are encouraged to review the below institutional policies and informational sections and reach out to the specific office with any questions. To view this institutional information, please visit the Institutional Information page (https://resources.uta.edu/provost/course-related-info/institutional-policies.php) which includes the following policies among others:

  • Drop Policy
  • Disability Accommodations
  • Title IX Policy
  • Academic Integrity
  • Student Feedback Survey
  • Final Exam Schedule

Additional Information

Face Covering Policy

While the use of face coverings on campus is no longer mandatory, all students and instructional staff are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings while they are on campus. This is particularly true inside buildings and within classrooms and labs where social distancing is not possible due to limited space. If a student needs accommodations to ensure social distancing in the classroom due to being at high risk, they are encouraged to work directly with the Student Access and Resource Center to assist in these accommodations. If students need masks, they may obtain them at the Central Library, the E.H. Hereford University Center’s front desk or in their department.

Attendance

At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required. Rather, each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’ academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. As the instructor of this course, I use the quizzes and discussion assignments to gauge your active involvement in the class, but I do not have a separate attendance grade.

However, while UT Arlington does not require instructors to take attendance in their courses, the U.S. Department of Education requires that the University have a mechanism in place to verify Federal Student Aid recipients’ attendance in courses. UT Arlington instructors should be prepared to report the last date of attendance as part of the final grading process. Specifically, when assigning a student a grade of F, faculty must report the last date a student attended their class based on evidence of academic engagement such as a test, participation in a class project or presentation, or an engagement online via Canvas. This date is reported to the Department of Education for federal financial aid recipients.

Distance education courses require regular and substantive online interaction and participation. Students must participate in online course activities to demonstrate attendance; logging into an online class is not sufficient by itself to demonstrate attendance.

Academic Integrity

Students enrolled in all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.

I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. Additional information is available at https://www.uta.edu/conduct/.

Emergency Exit Procedures

Should we experience an emergency event that requires evacuation of the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit, which is located to the left as you leave UH09. When exiting the building during an emergency, do not take an elevator but use the stairwells instead. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist individuals with disabilities.

Academic Success Center

The Academic Success Center (ASC) includes a variety of resources and services to help you maximize your learning and succeed as a student at the University of Texas at Arlington. ASC services include supplemental instruction, peer-led team learning, tutoring, mentoring and TRIO SSS. Academic Success Center services are provided at no additional cost to UTA students. For additional information visit: Academic Success Center. To request disability accommodations for tutoring, please complete this form.

The English Writing Center (411 in the Central Library)

The Writing Center offers FREE tutoring in 15-, 30-, 45-, and 60-minute face-to-face and online sessions to all UTA students on any phase of their UTA coursework. Register and make appointments online at the Writing Center (https://uta.mywconline.com). Classroom visits, workshops, and specialized services for graduate students and faculty are also available. Please see Writing Center: OWL for detailed information on all our programs and services.

The Library’s 2nd floor Academic Plaza (http://library.uta.edu/academic-plaza) offers students a central hub of support services, including IDEAS Center, University Advising Services, Transfer UTA and various college/school advising hours. Services are available during the library’s hours of operation.

Emergency Phone Numbers

In case of an on-campus emergency, call the UT Arlington Police Department at 817-272-3003 (non-campus phone), 2-3003 (campus phone). You may also dial 911. The non-emergency number is 817-272-3381.

Syllabus for HIST3378: Pirates, Planters, and Freedom Fighters

HIST 3378-001 & AAST 3378-001
Spring 2022; Tues-Thurs 3:30PM – 4:50PM
University Hall 09

Instructor Information

  1. Instructor: John Garrigus; website: http://johngarrigus.com
  2. Office: University Hall 343
  3. Student Office Hours: 5pm to 5:30pm Tuesday; 5pm to 7pm Thurs
  4. History Department Office Telephone: 817-272-2661
  5. Email: garrigus@uta.edu
  6. Faculty Profile: https://mentis.uta.edu/explore/profile/john-garrigus

Course Information

Section Information: HIST3378-001 and AAS3378-001
Time and Place of Class Meetings:  Because of COVID, before Feb. 8, we will meet as an asynchronous class on Canvas; beginning on Tuesday Feb. 8, we’ll meet Tues and Thurs. 3:30pm to 4:50; University Hall 09.

Required Books (2): Marcus Rediker, Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age (Beacon Press, 2005), $13 to rent; and Philippe R. Girard, Toussaint Louverture: A Revolutionary Life (New York: Basic Books, 2016), $12 to rent. Other materials will be available on Canvas.

Technology Requirements: We will use Canvas throughout the semester.

Description of Course Content: This course examines how people experienced oppression and freedom in the Caribbean islands in the years 1600 to 1804. Piracy and sugar plantation slavery are two of our major topics; the third major topic is the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), the only slave uprising to end slavery and establish a new independent nation.

In addition, the course will train you in how to interpret primary and secondary sources, skills that are the foundation of historical knowledge. Because pirates and enslaved people (mostly) did not leave written documents, this is a special challenge for our topic!

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to identify major Caribbean countries on a map. To be assessed on a map quiz.
  • Students will be able to describe and analyze primary sources. To be assessed in three assigned papers.
  • Students will be able to describe secondary sources. To be assessed in three assigned papers.
  • Students will be able to describe historical thinking skills and apply them to Caribbean history. To be assessed in three assigned papers.

Major Assignments and Grading

Assignment Points Description
Map quiz 50 On a blank map, you’ll identify 10 Caribbean islands or countries, and the colonial language spoken there today. We’ll do this face-to-face in class in mid-February.
10 weekly journal questions 100 For 14 weeks this semester, I’ll post a reflection question about a primary source.  You’ll answer 10 of them over the semester. This should be an easy A! I’ll award 10 points for an answer that shows that you did the reading, and 5 points for one that does not show this.
Book quizzes 100 Using Canvas, we’ll have multiple-choice quizzes over each of our two books plus some assigned chapters; you can take each quiz 2 times and only the highest score counts.
Discussion/participation 100 I’ll assess this on discussion boards during the first 3 weeks of the semester, then I’ll take daily notes on your presence and face to face discussion in the classroom.
2 Writing Center visits 50 About a week before each of our papers, you’ll visit the UTA Writing Center on-line or in the Central Library to go over a draft of your work. When I get confirmation from the Writing Center, I’ll give you the points. Make an appointment at https://www.uta.edu/owl/. Be sure to take them a copy of the assignment.
2 papers 300 You’ll write a 5-page paper based on primary and secondary sources about pirates and, following the same framework, about planters.
Final paper 300 At the end of the semester, you’ll write a third paper about Caribbean freedom fighters and then merge it with revised versions of your two earlier papers for the final paper.
TOTAL 1000 At the end of the semester, students who have accumulated 900 or more points will receive a “A”; 800 to 899 is a “B”; 700 to 799 is a “C”; etc.

 

Course Schedule

Pirates

Week 1: January 18-20

Lectures: Introduction to Caribbean history and geography; native civilizations; Spanish colonization; how to analyze a primary source; big questions in Caribbean history
Reading: Rediker, Chapters 1 and 2
Assignments: Journal answer; book quiz

Week 2: January 25-27

Lectures: Silver and world history; the beginnings of piracy; navies and the rise of gunpowder states; imperial struggles; how to summarize a primary source; how to contextualize
Reading: Rediker, Chapters 3 and 4
Assignments: Journal answer; book quiz

Week 3: February 1-3

Lectures: pirates versus privateers; pirates and indentured servants;  pirates versus buccaneers; how to infer from a primary source; how to “monitor” a primary source
Reading: Rediker, Chapters 5 and 6
Assignments: Journal answer; book quiz

Week 4: February 8-10

Lectures: Morgan and Jamaica; The French version of “Santo Domingo”; piracy’s golden age; pirates and enslaved people; primary sources and corroboration
Assignments: Journal answer; book quiz
Reading: Rediker, Chapters 7 and 8

Week 5: February 15-17

Lectures: Piracy as a culture; piracy and world history; piracy and the public imagination; the end of Caribbean piracy

Assignments:  Writing Center assignment due Wednesday, Feb. 16, paper due on Canvas Friday Feb. 18

Planters

Week 6: February 22-24

Lectures: How to grow sugar; the “integrated” plantation; Caribbean slavery versus other slavery systems; slavery and/in archives
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz; map quiz (Feb. 22)
Reading:
Brown, “Worlds of Wealth and Death” pp13-59

Week 7: March 1-3

Lectures: the slave trade; sugar and the European economy; growing coffee and other crops; maroons
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz
Reading: Burnard, “The Sexual Life of an Eighteenth-Century Jamaican Slave Overseer,” 163–89.

Week 8: March 8-10

Lectures: manumission; slavery and the law; overseers, drivers, and absentee planters; free people of color
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz
Reading: Cheney, “Husband and Wife,” 130–60.

Week 9: March 15-17 SPRING BREAK

Week 10: March 22-24

Lectures: religion and culture in Caribbean slave societies; men, women, and children; war and trade
Reading: Garrigus, 3 Mythic Macandals; Médor’s Town and Country; Médor’s Medicines
Assignments: Writing Center report due; journal answer; reading quiz

Week 11: March 29-31

Lectures: slave resistance and slave rebellion
Assignments: Paper due on Canvas Friday April 1

Freedom Fighters

Week 12: April 5-7

Lectures: Saint-Domingue and the American Revolution; free people of color in Saint-Domingue; Saint-Domingue and the French Revolution
Reading: Girard, Introduction, Chapters 1-4
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz

Week 13: April 12-14

Lectures: Haitian Revolution: an overview; Vincent Ogé and Julian Raimond; the uprising of 1791
Reading: Girard, Chapters 5-10
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz

Week 14: April 19-22

Lectures: The end of slavery in Saint-Domingue; the rise of Toussaint Louverture; Toussaint’s plantation society; Napoleon and Saint-Domingue
Reading: Girard, Chapters 11-15
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz

Week 15: April 26-28

Lectures: The rise of Jean-Jacques Dessalines; the invasion of 1802; Haitian independence
Reading: Girard, Chapters 16-21
Assignments: Journal answer; reading quiz

Week 16: May 3

Lectures: Final paper in-class Q&A and work session
Assignment: Journal answer

FINAL PROJECT DUE: May 10 FINAL PAPER

As instructor, I reserve the right to change the course schedule and policies in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

Institutional Information

UTA students are encouraged to review the below institutional policies and informational sections and reach out to the specific office with any questions. To view this institutional information, please visit the Institutional Information page (https://resources.uta.edu/provost/course-related-info/institutional-policies.php) which includes the following policies among others:

  • Drop Policy
  • Disability Accommodations
  • Title IX Policy
  • Academic Integrity
  • Student Feedback Survey
  • Final Exam Schedule

 

Face Covering Policy

While the use of face coverings on campus is no longer mandatory, all students and instructional staff are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings while they are on campus. This is particularly true inside buildings and within classrooms and labs where social distancing is not possible due to limited space. If a student needs accommodations to ensure social distancing in the classroom due to being at high risk, they are encouraged to work directly with the Student Access and Resource Center to assist in these accommodations. If students need masks, they may obtain them at the Central Library, the E.H. Hereford University Center’s front desk or in their department.

Attendance

At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required. Rather, each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’ academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. As the instructor of this course, I use the quizzes and discussion assignments to gauge your active involvement in the class, but I do not have a separate attendance grade.

However, while UT Arlington does not require instructors to take attendance in their courses, the U.S. Department of Education requires that the University have a mechanism in place to verify Federal Student Aid recipients’ attendance in courses. UT Arlington instructors should be prepared to report the last date of attendance as part of the final grading process. Specifically, when assigning a student a grade of F, faculty must report the last date a student attended their class based on evidence of academic engagement such as a test, participation in a class project or presentation, or an engagement online via Canvas. This date is reported to the Department of Education for federal financial aid recipients.

Distance education courses require regular and substantive online interaction and participation. Students must participate in online course activities to demonstrate attendance; logging into an online class is not sufficient by itself to demonstrate attendance.

Academic Integrity

Students enrolled in all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.

I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. Additional information is available at https://www.uta.edu/conduct/.

Emergency Exit Procedures

Should we experience an emergency event that requires evacuation of the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit, which is located to the left as you leave UH09. When exiting the building during an emergency, do not take an elevator but use the stairwells instead. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist individuals with disabilities.

Academic Success Center

The Academic Success Center (ASC) includes a variety of resources and services to help you maximize your learning and succeed as a student at the University of Texas at Arlington. ASC services include supplemental instruction, peer-led team learning, tutoring, mentoring and TRIO SSS. Academic Success Center services are provided at no additional cost to UTA students. For additional information visit: Academic Success Center. To request disability accommodations for tutoring, please complete this form.

The English Writing Center (411 in the Central Library)

The Writing Center offers FREE tutoring in 15-, 30-, 45-, and 60-minute face-to-face and online sessions to all UTA students on any phase of their UTA coursework. Register and make appointments online at the Writing Center (https://uta.mywconline.com). Classroom visits, workshops, and specialized services for graduate students and faculty are also available. Please see Writing Center: OWL for detailed information on all our programs and services.

Emergency Phone Numbers

In case of an on-campus emergency, call the UT Arlington Police Department at 817-272-3003 (non-campus phone), 2-3003 (campus phone). You may also dial 911. The non-emergency number is 817-272-3381.

 

Syllabus for HIST3375 Latin America: Origins Through Independence

HIST 3375-001 & 002/ MAS 3375-001

Fall 2022 On-line class

Land Acknowledgement

UT Arlington respectfully acknowledges the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes upon whose historical homelands this University is located. Their ancestors resided here for generations before being forcibly displaced by U.S. settlers and soldiers in the mid-1800s. We recognize the historical presence of the Caddo Nation and other Tribal Nations in the region; the ongoing presence and achievements of many people who moved to the area due to the Indian Relocation program of the 1950s and 1960s; and the vital presence and accomplishments of our Native students, faculty, and staff.

Instructor Information

Instructor: John Garrigus; website: http://johngarrigus.com

Instructor Office: University Hall 343

Student “Drop-In” Hours:

Mon. and Wed., 10am to 11am; I’ll also be available on Teams in those hours

History Department Office Telephone: 817-272-2661

Email: garrigus@uta.edu

Faculty Profile: https://mentis.uta.edu/explore/profile/john-garrigus

Course Information

Section Information: HIST 3375-001

Time and Place of Class Meetings:  This is an asynchronous on-line course delivered on Canvas. Asynchronous means there is no set class time.

Required Books (4):

If you cannot afford our books, please contact me as soon as possible. I will try to connect you with resources that may be available so that this challenge does not affect your performance in the class.

  1. Charles C. Mann, 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (Vintage Books, 2006).
  2. Matthew Restall, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest (Oxford University Press, 2004). The 2021 revised edition is also good.
  3. Junia Ferreira Furtado, Chica da Silva: A Brazilian Slave of the Eighteenth Century (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009).
  4. John Charles Chasteen, Americanos: Latin America is Struggle for Independence (Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2008).
  5. Other required reading materials will be available on Canvas.

Technology Requirements:

We will use Canvas throughout the semester.

Description of Course Content

Focusing on the years from 1300 to 1825, this course charts the emergence of creole cultures in Mexico, Central America and South America in the years before political independence from Europe. We will focus on the cultural, social, and economic history of Latin America and, necessarily, on the indigenous, Iberian, and West African societies that shaped it. We will use and discuss the intellectual tools and approaches historians use to understand the past. Our readings reflect the ongoing “revisionism” that is an essential aspect of historical thinking. This course will also train you how to interpret primary and secondary sources, skills that are the foundation of historical knowledge.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students describe and assess different interpretations of Latin American history (assessed in on-line quizzes and country projects)
  • Students will be able to describe historical thinking skills and apply them to Latin American history (assessed in show-and-tell assignments and country projects)
  • Students use primary sources to support historical interpretations (assessed in discussion board postings and country projects)
  • Students apply historical interpretations to the colonial history of a specific Latin American country (assessed in country projects)

Expectations

You can expect me to:

  • answer your email within 24 hours if you send it through Canvas. At some points in the term, my inbox gets quite full, but I do want to hear from you. If you email me and don’t hear back from me within 24 hours, please send a follow up email. I will appreciate the gentle reminder.
  • be glad to meet you in person! You are welcome to drop by during my on-campus office hours or send me a message and I’ll try to find a mutually convenient time we can get together on campus.
  • give you ten days—Monday through Wednesday—to complete the discussion work and take the quizzes in each module.
  • let you take each module quiz twice, counting the highest score.
  • give you extensions of a few days for our country projects IF you are keeping up with the quizzes and discussion.
  • give you detailed feedback on each country project. On the next project, I’ll grade you on whether you used my feedback to improve your work. This course is designed to help you grow your abilities.
  • take plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty quite seriously. Please read the academic dishonesty section and ask me — throughout the semester — if you have questions.

I expect you to:

  • contact me using Canvas or email when you have questions or problems concerning the class.
  • keep up with the pace of the class.
  • use the UTA Writing Center for your assignments. They have on-line appointments! Learning how to use UTA’s resources is essential (and normal) for the learning process.
  • post your Show-N-Tell materials to our Canvas discussion board by Sam Monday of that week.
  • study the posted criteria [I call them “grading grids”] for the different country projects before you undertake them.
  • understand what plagiarism is and ask me if you have questions any time during the semester.

Grading and Assignment Information

Assignment Points Description
Map quiz 20 You’ll see a map with places numbered 1 to 10. In a Canvas quiz you’ll write out the names of the Latin American cities or major archeological sites at those places. You can take it twice and keep the highest score.
Syllabus quiz 20 We’ll start this course with a multiple-choice quiz about this syllabus. Like all our quizzes, you can take it twice.
4 quizzes on “Unpacking” 20 In four modules during the semester, you will read and do exercises on a website called World History: Unpacking the Evidence. [http://chnm.gmu.edu/worldhistorysources/whmunpacking.html] In Module 2, for example, we will study how historians use images (paintings, photographs) as primary sources. There will be a five-question multiple-choice quiz on this “Unpacking the Evidence” materials in each of these four modules. In each of those four modules, Unpacking the Evidence will be the basis of our discussion.
14 quizzes 98 In every module, you’ll read selections from one of our books and watch on-line lectures in screencast format. Some of the lectures will review important or difficult elements of the reading, and others will go deeper into historical topics. The lectures are NOT substitutes for reading the books, but are designed to help you get more out of them. Every module has about 30 minutes of screencast lectures, and a multiple-choice quiz of about 7 questions on the content. You’ll be able to take each quiz twice within a 9-day window. Your highest score will

count.

9 discussions 90 During 9 of our modules, you’ll be making two discussion posts about the “Unpacking” website, or the SNTs posted for that module. I’ll assign you a discussion grade of 1 to 10 for each of those 9 modules. Extra credit for video posts.
1 Show-N-Tell presentation 72 In Module 1, you will pick one of the four types of primary sources [images, maps, official documents, and personal accounts] we will study in “Unpacking the Evidence.” Then you will sign up to do an SNT, analyzing, on the discussion board, an example of that type of primary source, provided by me. The course schedule shows when each of the different primary sources has its SNT week on the discussion board. I will supply you will a detailed template for your SNT analysis. The rest of the students in the class will review and critique your analysis. You will be graded for playing an active role in the class discussion of your post.
2 Writing Center consultations 50 About a week before each of our Country Projects, you’ll visit the on-line UTA Writing Center to go over a draft of your work. When I get confirmation from the Writing Center, I’ll give you the points. Make an appointment at https://www.uta.edu/owl/. Be sure to give them a copy of the assignment.
Country Project 1

Due Sept. 16

80 In Module 1, you’ll choose one Latin American country to be the basis for a series of 5-page papers, combining research with our assigned reading.
Country Project 2

Due Oct. 7

140 For each of the three country projects you will follow a template that I provide. Your job is to discuss whether the evidence from our assigned books can be seen in the history of your country.
Country Project 3
Due Nov. 11
160 Some countries are NOT eligible for Country Projects: Belize, El Salvador, Cuba and the other Caribbean islands, Costa Rica, and Panama.
Final Country Project

Due Dec. 12

250 At the end of the semester you’ll use a template I provide to combine your three country project assignments, plus a fourth segment about independence, into a single larger paper about the country you picked.
TOTAL 1000 At the end of the semester, students who have accumulated 900 or more points will receive a “A”; 800 to 899 is a “B”; 700 to 799 is a “C”; etc.

 

 

Course Schedule

The Americas Before Columbus

Module 0

  • Buy or rent the 4 books
  • Study the syllabus
  • Choose a country

Module 1 August 22 The World in the 1400s and “The Encounter”

  • Optional Class Q&A on Microsoft TEAMS
  • Make 1 discussion post introducing yourself to the class. Extra credit for Video introductions.
  • Take syllabus quiz
  • Sign up for Show-N-Tell
  • 27 minutes of on-line lectures, plus quiz
  • Email Dr. G. about which country you chose for your project
  • Read Mann, ix-xii, Chasteen, Preface; Mann, Ch1 (3-30)
  • Make 1 discussion post about the reading

Module 2 August 29 The Achievements of Early Americans

  • Optional Class Q&A on Microsoft TEAMS
  • 25 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Go to Using Images As Primary Sources; read “Getting Started, Questions to Ask,” “Sample Analysis’
  • Complete “You Be the Historian” exercise; take “Unpacking” quiz;
  • Make 2 discussion posts on “Using Images”
  • Read Mann, Ch3 (68-106) and Ch4 (107-150). Ch2 (33-67) is optional

Module 3 September 5 Early Americans and the Environment

  • Optional Class Q&A on Microsoft TEAMS
  • Image Show-N—Tell postings due Monday 8am
  • 33 Minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Read Mann, Ch 6 (194-227) and Ch9 (315-349)
  • Make 2 discussion postings about the SNTs on images

The Spanish Conquest

Module 4 September 12 Looking More Closely at the Conquest; CP 1 due

  • Optional CPI Q&A on Microsoft TEAMS
  • CP1 due at 5pm [Friday September 16]
  • 27 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Restall, xiii-xix & Chl (l-27); Restall, Ch2 (24-43)

Module 5 September 19 African & Indian Conquistadors

  • Optional class discussion on Microsoft TEAMS [2021-09-21 Tue] 1pm
  • Go to Uiirigmps as Primary Sources; read “Getting Started,” “Questions to Ask,” “Sample Analysis”
  • Complete “You Be the Historian” exercise; take “Unpacking” quiz;
  • 20 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Make 2 discussion postings about “Using Maps”
  • Restall Ch3 (44-63); Restall Ch4 (64-76) & Ch5 (77-99)

Module 6 September 26 Stories about the Destruction of Civilizations— Optional class discussion on TEAMS

  • Maps SNT postings due Monday 8am
  • 18 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Restall, Ch6 (100-130); Restall Ch7 (131-145) & Epilogue (147-157)
  • Make 2 discussion postings about the SNTs on maps

Colonial Society

Module 7 October 3 People of mixed ancestry; CP2 due

  • Optional CP2 Q&A on TEAMS
  • CP2 due Friday, October 7, at 5pm
  • 23 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Furtado, preface (xvii-xxv); Introduction (1-19); Furtado, Chl (20-39)

Module 8 October 10 Colonial Economies

  • Go to Official Documents as Primary Sources; read “Getting Started,5 ’ ‘6 Questions to Ask,” “Sample Analysis”
  • Complete “You Be the Historian” exercise; take “Unpacking” quiz;
  • 20 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Make 2 discussion postings about “Using Official Documents”

Module 9 October 17 Brazil and Africa

  • 30 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Furtado, Ch2 (40-68), Furtado, Ch3 (69-103)
  • Make 2 discussion postings

Module 10 October 24 Urban Spaces

  • Official documents SNTs due Monday Sam
  • 33 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Make 2 discussion postings about the SNTs on official documents
  • Furtado, Ch4 (104-129); Furtado, Ch5 (130-161)

Module 11, October 31 Reforming Two Empires

  • Go to Using Personal Accounts as Primary Sources; read “Getting Started,” “Questions to Ask,” “Sample Analysis”
  • Complete “You Be the Historian” exercise; take “Unpacking” quiz;
  • 26 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Furtado, Ch6 (162-192); Furtado, Ch7 & Ch8 (193-238)
  • Make 2 discussion postings about “Using Personal Accounts”

Module 12 November 7 The American, French and Haitian Revolutions; CP3 due

  • Optional CP3 Q&A
  • CP3 due Friday, November 11 at 5pm
  • 25 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • 9 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Read Furtado, Ch9 (239-258), Furtado, Ch11 (284-304)

Wars for Independence

Module 13  November 14 Spain’s Crisis

  • Personal accounts SNTs due Monday 8am
  • 26 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Make 2 discussion postings about the SNTs on personal accounts
  • Read Chasteen, 6-34; Chasteen, 35-65

Module 14  November 21  THANKSGIVING WEEK Revolutions in Mexico and Argentina

  • 30 minutes of on-line lectures plus quiz
  • Read Chasteen, 66-105; 105-158

Module 15  November 28 Bolivar and San Martin; Independence Overview

  • Optional Country Project Q&A on Microsoft TEAMS
  • 11 minutes of on—line lecture and quiz
  • Chasteen, 159-181; 182-192

Module 16  December 5 Final CP Due

FINAL PROJECT DUE: Dec 10 FINAL PAPER

As instructor, I reserve the right to change the course schedule and policies in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

Institutional Information

UTA students are encouraged to review the below institutional policies and informational sections and reach out to the specific office with any questions. To view this institutional information, please visit the Institutional Information page (https://resources.uta.edu/provost/course-related-info/institutional-policies.php) which includes the following policies among others:

  • Drop Policy
  • Disability Accommodations
  • Title IX Policy
  • Academic Integrity
  • Student Feedback Survey
  • Final Exam Schedule

Additional Information

Face Covering Policy

While the use of face coverings on campus is no longer mandatory, all students and instructional staff are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings while they are on campus. This is particularly true inside buildings and within classrooms and labs where social distancing is not possible due to limited space. If a student needs accommodations to ensure social distancing in the classroom due to being at high risk, they are encouraged to work directly with the Student Access and Resource Center to assist in these accommodations. If students need masks, they may obtain them at the Central Library, the E.H. Hereford University Center’s front desk or in their department.

Attendance

At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required. Rather, each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’ academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. As the instructor of this course, I use the quizzes and discussion assignments to gauge your active involvement in the class, but I do not have a separate attendance grade.

However, while UT Arlington does not require instructors to take attendance in their courses, the U.S. Department of Education requires that the University have a mechanism in place to verify Federal Student Aid recipients’ attendance in courses. UT Arlington instructors should be prepared to report the last date of attendance as part of the final grading process. Specifically, when assigning a student a grade of F, faculty must report the last date a student attended their class based on evidence of academic engagement such as a test, participation in a class project or presentation, or an engagement online via Canvas. This date is reported to the Department of Education for federal financial aid recipients.

Distance education courses require regular and substantive online interaction and participation. Students must participate in online course activities to demonstrate attendance; logging into an online class is not sufficient by itself to demonstrate attendance.

Academic Integrity

Students enrolled in all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.

I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. Additional information is available at https://www.uta.edu/conduct/.

Emergency Exit Procedures

Should we experience an emergency event that requires evacuation of the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit, which is located to the left as you leave UH09. When exiting the building during an emergency, do not take an elevator but use the stairwells instead. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist individuals with disabilities.

Academic Success Center

The Academic Success Center (ASC) includes a variety of resources and services to help you maximize your learning and succeed as a student at the University of Texas at Arlington. ASC services include supplemental instruction, peer-led team learning, tutoring, mentoring and TRIO SSS. Academic Success Center services are provided at no additional cost to UTA students. For additional information visit: Academic Success Center. To request disability accommodations for tutoring, please complete this form.

The English Writing Center (411 in the Central Library)

The Writing Center offers FREE tutoring in 15-, 30-, 45-, and 60-minute face-to-face and online sessions to all UTA students on any phase of their UTA coursework. Register and make appointments online at the Writing Center (https://uta.mywconline.com). Classroom visits, workshops, and specialized services for graduate students and faculty are also available. Please see Writing Center: OWL for detailed information on all our programs and services.

The Library’s 2nd floor Academic Plaza (http://library.uta.edu/academic-plaza) offers students a central hub of support services, including IDEAS Center, University Advising Services, Transfer UTA and various college/school advising hours. Services are available during the library’s hours of operation.

 

Emergency Phone Numbers

In case of an on-campus emergency, call the UT Arlington Police Department at 817-272-3003 (non-campus phone), 2-3003 (campus phone). You may also dial 911. The non-emergency number is 817-272-3381.

 

Syllabus for HIST5341: Approaches to World History

HIST 5341: Approaches to World History
Spring 2022; Tuesday evenings
University Hall 13

Instructor Information

1. Instructor: John Garrigus; website: http://johngarrigus.com
2. Office: University Hall 343
3. Student Office Hours: 5pm to 5:30pm Tuesday; 5pm to 7pm Thurs
4. History Department Office Telephone: 817-272-2661
5. Email: garrigus@uta.edu
6. Faculty Profile: https://mentis.uta.edu/explore/profile/john-garrigus

Description:

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the broad outlines of world history and historiography and to strengthen their ability to research and teach in this field.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Students will be able to describe and analyze key works and theories in the field of world or global history. Assessed in class discussions and book reviews.
2. Students will be able to effectively communicate their description and analysis of world historiography verbally, in writing, and using information technology. Assessed in weekly class discussions, book reviews, and the StoryMaps/timeline assignment.
3. Students will be able to describe and compare major historiographical approaches in the field of world or global history. Assessed in historiographical comparison essays and the final historiography review essay.

Required Books : [listed in order]

• Olstein, Diego. Thinking History Globally. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2015.
• Harari, Yuval N. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. New York, NY: Harper, 2015.
• Marks, Robert B. Origins of the Modern World: A Global and Environmental Narrative. 3rd ed. Rowman & Littlefield, 2015.
• Green, Toby. Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019.
• Colley, Linda. The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Warfare, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World. N.Y.: Liverright Publishing, 2021.
• Beckert, Sven. Empire of Cotton: A Global History. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2014.
• Davis, Mike. Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World. New York : Verso, 2001.
• Getachew, Adom. Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination. Princeton N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2019.

Grading:

At the end of the semester, students who have accumulated 900 or more points will receive a “A”; 800 to 899 is a “B”; 700 to 799 is a “C”; etc.
Assignment Points
Reaction Paper 50
Pre-recorded author biography 100
Historiographic comparison papers (3) 300
Discussion/participation 100
StoryMap/ Timeline 100
Final historiographic review essay 350
TOTAL 1000

Description of Major Assignments

Reaction Paper

Students will produce a two-page reaction paper about the Olstein book. This will describe Olstein’s aims, the structure of the book, and his major ideas.

Pre-recorded author biography

Students will sign up to make a pre-recorded audio and video presentation on one of the nine authors we are reading this semester. The method of recording these presentations is up to each student, as long as they can be uploaded to, or linked to from, our Canvas course page. You can use Canvas Studio, PowerPoint, Prezi, or online screencast tools like Screencast-o-matic. You may upload videos to YouTube.
The presentation should be 5 to 10 minutes long and it should sketch the author’s intellectual biography [graduate advisors, significant influences], his or her other books, and reviews of this book.
The presentation must be uploaded or linked to the class Canvas page no later than 5pm of the first day the class will discuss the book.

StoryMap/Timeline

Students will sign up to make a computer-assisted visual overview of one of the seven books we are reading this semester, not including Olstein. The overview can take the form of an on-line map, using the websites ArcGIS StoryMap or https://storymap.knightlab.com/, or a on-line timeline, like those available on https://www.sutori.com. The overview must include at least ten elements from the book, illustrating its chronological or geographical range. The overview should describe the author’s thesis and address how this range influences that thesis
The overview must be linked to the class Canvas page no later than 5pm of the second day the class will discuss the book.

Historiographic comparison papers

Students will write three historiography papers, each comparing and analyzing two books: Harari and Marks, Green and Colley, Davis and Beckert. Each paper will be about 1,000 to 1,200 words long. The papers will compare the methodologies, goals, and arguments of the two works. How do the authors define the kind of work they are doing? What are the time- and geographic-scales of their analysis? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each approach?

Discussion

• Classroom participation is a big part of this course!
• Simply attending class does not count in this area, though I do take attendance at every class meeting.

Final Essay

• You will write a 3,000 word historiographical review essay describing recent books in the field of world history.

Class Schedule

Week 1: January 18 — online
Read (posted on Canvas) before class and be prepared to discuss: 1) Vinay Lal, “World History and Its Politics,” Economic and Political Weekly 46, no. 46 (2011): 40–47; and 2) Richard Drayton and David Motadel, “Discussion: The Futures of Global History,” Journal of Global History 13, no. 1 (March 2018): 1–21.

Week 2: January 25 – online
Read before class: Olstein, Introduction and Chapters 1-8

Week 3: February 1 – online
Read before class: Olstein, Chapter 9; Harari, Chapters 1-10

Week 4: February 8 First live meeting
Read before class: Harari, Chapters 11-20

Week 5: February 15
Read before class: Marks, entire; Harari/Marks comparison paper due

Week 6: February 22
Read before class: Green, pages 1-239

Week 7: March 1
Read before class: Green, pages 243-475

Week 8: March 8
Read before class: Colley, pages 1-250

Week 9: March 15-17 SPRING BREAK

Week 10: March 22
Read before class: Colley 250- 424; Green/Colley comparison paper due

Week 11: March 29
Read before class: Said, Orientalism [chapters to be supplied]; Beckert, 1-6

Week 12: April 5
Read before class: Beckert, Chapters 7-14;

Week 13: April 12
Read before class: Davis, Chapters 1-6

Week 14: April 19
Read before class: Davis, Chapters 7-12; Beckert/Davis paper due

Week 15: April 26
Read before class: Getachew, Introduction, Chapters 1-2

Week 16: May 3
Read before class: Getachew, remainder
Historiographic review essay due: May 10

Institutional Information:

UTA students are encouraged to review the below institutional policies and informational sections and reach out to the specific office with any questions. To view this institutional information, please visit the Institutional Information page (https://resources.uta.edu/provost/course-related-info/institutional-policies.php) which includes the following policies among others:
• Drop Policy
• Disability Accommodations
• Title IX Policy
• Academic Integrity
• Student Feedback Survey
• Final Exam Schedule

Attendance:

At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required. Rather, each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’ academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. As the instructor of this course, I use the quizzes and discussion assignments to gauge your active involvement in the class but I do not have a separate attendance grade.

Academic Integrity:

Students enrolled in all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:
I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.
I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.
UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. Additional information is available at https://www.uta.edu/conduct/.

Academic Success Center:

The Academic Success Center (ASC) includes a variety of resources and services to help you maximize your learning and succeed as a student at the University of Texas at Arlington. ASC services include supplemental instruction, peer-led team learning, tutoring, mentoring and TRIO SSS. Academic Success Center services are provided at no additional cost to UTA students. For additional information visit: Academic Success Center. To request disability accommodations for tutoring, please complete this form.

Student Support Services:

UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills, deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses. Resources include tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring, personal counseling, and federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may visit the reception desk at University College (Ransom Hall), call the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, send a message to resources@uta.edu, or view the information at http://www.uta.edu/universitycollege/resources/index.php.

Emergency Phone Numbers:

In case of an on-campus emergency, call the UT Arlington Police Department at 817-272-3003 (non-campus phone), 2-3003 (campus phone). You may also dial 911. The non-emergency number is 817-272-3381.

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